The Secret of Autosuggestion

autosuggestion

I write alot here about believing in yourself, moving past fear, improving your self-confidence and having faith. These are all points that I’ve built up over time, and I recognize that they might not come easily to everyone. Want an easy way to increase your faith, have an unshakable belief in the success of your dreams, and attract your desires? Read on about the secret of autosuggestion.

What Is Autosuggestion?

I first learned about autosuggestion from Napoleon Hill’s book, Think and Grow Rich. If you haven’t read it, you really should. Like, now (lol). I guarantee it will change your life if you grasp his concepts. My brother gave me this book 12 years ago and I never read it. Sometimes its very true that if you want to hide something, put it in a book. But I never got rid of it, I just packed it up and brought it along every time I moved. Finally, 2 years ago, I dusted it off. To my surprise Hill gave me a blueprint to follow in order to reach my goals. And autosuggestion is one of the powerful yet simple processes that he describes to ensure your success.

Simply put, autosuggestion is repeating a message to yourself, as often as possible, in order to change an old belief or install a new one. What you’re doing is making your subconscious mind take notice of this information and over time it absorbs the information as a belief. You can do this by repeating affirmations to yourself, reading or watching something over and over again, listening to audio with the message recorded on it, etc. What’s crucial to making autosuggestion work is inundating your mind with the message or belief you want to utilize. You can’t just do it one or a few times, you must injest this message at least twice a day for it to become part of your belief system.

A Real-World Example

I’ve previously mentioned that I don’t watch the news. My mind is such that I get easily affected by the images I see and messages I hear. So hearing about murder, mayhem and general unease really bums me out.

Think about how often you watch or read the news. Count how many news programs, websites, blogs, Facebook status updates, Tweets, etc that you read in the course of a day containing news. If I did watch the news I’d guess that I’d watch 1 program, read a local, national and international news blog or website, and read at least 5 news Tweets a day. That’s not really alot, we’re talking about an hour of my time per day. But that’s 9 times that I’ve effortlessly absorbed the news. I can’t even guestimate how many times I’d talk to my friends or coworkers about the news.

Let’s take the example a step further:

  • for argument’s sake, lets say that as I got my morning cup of coffee, my coworkers and I discussed how money is tight and we’re in a recession right now.
  • I go back to my desk and browse the front page of CNN.com. There’s a video, “Irked Man Urges Credit Card Revolt” [attorney refuses to pay after interest rate hike].
  • Another video is “Meet The ‘Mayor’ of Skid Row” [Skid Row activist in L.A.; security and police sirens are visible in the video].
  • Other stories: “Retirement Planning for the Laid Off”, #10 on the Hot Topics list is “Where the Jobs Are.”
  • Then I head over to WashingtonPost.com. There’s an ad that reads: “if you die today, who will take care of your family?”
  • Other home page stories: “Modest Gains Seen In December Retail Sales”, “Lockheed to Cut 1,200 Jobs As Pentagon Work Slows”, and another ad at the bottom, “Free Credit Report”. At this point, I decide to start my work.
  • After I’ve done some work, I take a break and head over to HuffingtonPost.com. Front-page financial stories are “BofA Customer: Why Can’t I See Why You Took My Money?”, The First HuffPost Book Club Pick of 2010: Shadow Elite by Janine Wedel [book about the rise of a “transnational” class of elites that has rigged the system so they can “institutionalize their subversion of it.”], “Consumers Are Moving Their Money to Credit Unions, Rising Membership Shows”, “Some Nonprofit Student Lenders Accused of Misconduct” and an ad “Exposed: Obama and Bernanke’s Secret War on the Dollar”.

Now count how many news stories that is, that has a negative take on our current financial situation. How would reading all those stories make you feel? For this example, I didn’t even read the stories and I don’t feel all that great. In the total course of an hour, my eyes have taken in and my ears have heard stories telling me negative things about money 14 times. That’s not counting any news programs I’ll watch when I get home, or conversations I’ll have outside of work. Imagine if you told yourself that many times how smart, beautiful, powerful and successful you are in the course of ONE day. Do you think, at the end of a week, you’d believe it? We didn’t know anything about a recession until the media introduced the stories to us. Do you see how these are beliefs that we’ve accepted, because we’ve heard them over and over again?

How To Make Autosuggestion Work For You

Let’s say you want to change your beliefs about money. You should put yourself on a diet of positive news and statements about money. First of all, I’d suggest you refrain from watching, listening to and reading the news. But if that is not feasible for you, then I would suggest limiting your consumption of news stories that discuss money and the economy. Don’t engage in negative conversations about money, such as discussions about how broke someone is, that such-and-such got laid off, or that the recession is getting worse. Then, you can write affirmation statements and notes with the beliefs you want to install. For example, if you currently believe money is scarce, you could write affirmations like “money flows to me easily and effortlessly”, “I’m a magnet to money”, “I love money and MONEY LOVES ME”, and “God always provides”. Post these statements prominently around your house: in the bathroom, on your bedroom mirror, on your refrigerator, on the back of the living room door. You can also post them around your desk at work so you view them as you’re working. Lastly, repeat these statements out loud to yourself several times a day, at the very least when you first wake up and when you go to sleep.

It doesn’t matter if you don’t believe them, or you think this exercise is lame. Just keep repeating them over and over again, as many times as possible. And just like a Lil Wayne song, you’ll be saying these things to yourself and you’ll find that you believe them. Try this as an experiment and see how effective it is in your own life.

3 thoughts on “The Secret of Autosuggestion

  1. I LOVE this! Of course I always relate what you write to the scripture because there is always a connection for me. In the bible there is a law of confession. In greek it is HOMOLOCHIO – or to say what has been said. I have always practiced this. Also, one of my favorite scriptures is to “speak those things which be not as though they are”. I have practiced this for many years and I promise you that EVERY positive word, dream, fantasy, desire or want I have EVER spoken out loud about myself has come to pass! This also applied to the negative (which I no longer release from my mouth).

    I LOVE that you translate these things into terms we can all understand and appreciate! I LOVE it!

    1. Thanks for the love Ellen! And I’m glad that something I wrote resonates with the scriptural knowledge that you have. That helps me to know that I’m right! 😛

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